It appears that you are currently using Ad Blocking software. What are the consequences? Click here to learn more.

Last Modified On: January 15, 2001

Literature Search:
Sources Discovered by Patty Hatch


1.Author: Tyler, V.E.
Title: Phytomedicines in Wester Europe: potential impact on herbal medicine in the United States.
Journal: ACS symposium series, 1993. (534) p.25-37
Language: English
ISSN: 0097-6156

Abstract: Law and regulations governing the sales of phytomedicines (herbal remedies) in several European countries, particularly Germany, are compared to those in the United States. This provides an understanding as to why the development of medicines prepared from long-known plant drugs flourishes there with substantial support from the pharmaceutical industry and the medical community, while such research languishes here. The composition and therapeutic value of several popular European phytomedicinals, including those obtained from ginkgo, echinacea, chamomile, feverfew, valerian, milk thistle, St. John's wort, saw palmetto (sabal), hawthorn, and melissa (lemon balm) are discussed. Unless the regulatory attitude towards phytomedicines changes in the United States, it is likely that even the most exciting European developments will have little impact in this country and that many useful drugs widely used in Europe will continue to be unavailable here.

2. Title: Chamomile, Saw Palmetto, Milk Thistle
Journal: American Horticulturist, November 1991 v.70:no.11, pp.3-4
Language: English

Abstract: Various herbs are used for their medicinal value around the world, some more than others. European countries take these phytomedicines (plant-based medicines) especially seriously, using them not only as herbal remedies but also as medicinal remedies. Plants such as chamomile, saw palmetto, and milk thistle are among the more popular plants....

Saw Palmetto is the fruit of Serenoa repens, a member of the palm family that is particularly common in south Florida thickets. Fruit products of the saw palmetto are used throughout Germany, France, and Italy for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, a condition estimated to affect 50% of men over the age of 50. The fruits contain an ingredient that help shrink the prostate gland, which can help eliminate the need for transurethral resection surgery. The fruit supply is currently harvested from the wild, although one manufacturer has successfully introduced it into cultivation.

3. Author: Bricklin, Mark.
Title: The herb for the prostate. (use of saw palmetto to treat benign prostatic hypertrophy)
Source: Prevention (Emmanus, PA). v. 47 (August 1995) pp.19-20+, illustrations.

No abstract available.


[Go Back] Go back to David Mendosa's Home Page

[Go Back] Go back to David Mendosa's Saw Palmetto Page


Advertisment
Never Miss An Update!
Advertisment